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Wondersleep – For a Restful Sleep
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Food Supplement to Sleep Well and Have a Restful Sleep

For more details about our WonderLives Products, please visit our information page.

See here the detailed information

 

Wonderlives WonderSleep 

Indications:

– Provides a peaceful sleep
– Fights insomnia by allowing you to sleep well and have a Restful Sleep
– Combats neuromuscular fatigue
– Reduces stress, anxiety and depressive states
– Useful for regulating sleep cycles and favouring sleep without creating dependency
– Reduces mood swings;
– Assists in regulating binge eating.

Presentation WonderSleep:

Food Supplement to Sleep Well and Have a Restful Sleep

Pack of 60 capsules

Wondersleep Recommended Daily Intake (RDI) – Food Supplement to Sleep Well and Have a Restful Sleep

2 Capsules of Wondersleep at bedtime or according to a healthcare professional – 30min before sleep

The recommended daily dose of Wondersleep should not be exceeded.
Dietary supplements are not substitutes for a varied and balanced diet nor for a healthy way of life.
This product is not recommended for use in case of pregnancy and lactation.
Keep out of the sight and reach of children.
Not recommended in case of hypersensitivity or allergy to any of the constituents of the formulation.
Allergen-free

If in doubt, consult a healthcare professional

WonderSleep is Made in Portugal
WonderSleep is available only for countries of the European Community

WonderSleep – Food Supplement to Sleep Well and Have a Restful Sleep Ingredients:

Magnesium
Magnesium promotes the reduction of tiredness and fatigue, allowing normal functioning of the nervous system, muscle system and normal synthesis of proteins. In addition, it helps in the functioning of psychological function, in the maintenance of normal bones, in normal energy-producing metabolism, in the balance of electrolytes, in the maintenance of normal teeth, in the process of cell division, in maintaining blood pressure levels and boosting immunity 1.
Magnesium is the fourth most abundant mineral in the body.  Magnesium is part of more than 300 chemical reactions in the body and, although it exists in many foods, magnesium deficiency is now widespread among the population due to diets typical of industrialized countries 2.

Passiflora incarnata

Passiflora incarnata, popularly known as red passion fruit, is a plant originating in South and North America and belongs to the Family Passifloraceae. The vegetable holds high medicinal value due to its chemical and pharmacological properties of being antispasmodic, antiepileptic, antiasthmatic, narcotic, anti-hysterical, anxiolytic and sedative, due to the presence of passiflora, flavonoids, alkaloids and c-glycosides, the example parameter, which actively acts in the anxiolytic treatment with sedative activity, which does not create dependence, being nicknamed a natural tranquillizer 3,4,5.
The natural extract of Passiflora incarnata is the secondary metabolites present in the fruit and other parts of the vegetable, in which clinical trials prove the presence of vitamin A (retinol), vitamin C (ascorbic acid), B-complex vitamins, in addition to calcium, phosphorus and iron 6.

Californian poppy

The main health properties of the Californian poppy are sedatives, analgesics and antispasmodics. Helps normalize psychological functions by influencing the production of neurotransmitters at the brain level, which ensures well-being and good mood
This plant is also used in the treatment of various physical and psychological conditions, including insomnia, enuresis (incontinence), anxiety and nervous tension 7.

Nepeta cataria
This herb is a medicinal plant, grown in various parts of the world to treat digestive problems, fever, or to calm the nervous system. It also helps to relax and relieve the stress of the day-to-day.

Valerian
Valerian is a plant native to Europe, North America and Asia, whose root has been widely used for several decades by the population and physicians. Its main medicinal properties are as follows: sedatives, hypnotics and anxiolytics.
The extracts of this medicinal plant have an affinity for the GABA-A receptor (gamma-aminobutyric acid) that is involved in the promotion and regularization of sleep. Valerian contains a variety of chemical compounds including valeric acid and derivatives that act synergistically to exert a sedative effect, and in turn, a person tends to fall asleep better 8,9,10.

Humulus Lupulus
Hops is a medicinal plant, also known as Hitch, Rooster foot or Northern Vine, widely used to make beer, but which can also be used in the preparation of medicines to treat sleep disorders.
It has a sedative and antispasmodic feat: the bitter component found in the plant (α-acid 2-methyl-3-butene-2-ol) has the ability to increase the activity of the neurotransmitter γ-aminobutyric (GABA).  With this increase, the neurotransmission in the central nervous system is reduced, generating the sedative and antispasmodic effect.
It also has an anti-insomnia effect, as the literature shows that hops if combined with other herbs such as valerian, for example, are effective in combating sleep disorders. The same combination can have a relaxing effect 11,12.

5 Hidroxitriptophan
The 5 Hydroxytryptophan is a precursor to serotonin, a neurotransmitter responsible for the well-being, and some experts refer to it as the neurotransmitter of happiness.
5-HTP has advantages over tryptophan, mainly by more easily crossing the blood-brain barrier, since it does not bind to plasma albumin (90% of plasma tryptophan are linked to albumin, having to compete with other amino acids in the blood-brain barrier).  This increases its physiological effect as well as its benefits 13.
Main benefits: Anti-spasm; Natural antidepressant 13; Promotes sleep 14; Regulates blood pressure; Appetite regulator (helps control binge eating)15.

Melatonin
Melatonin is a hormone linked to the circadian cycle, that is, the way the body organizes its functions when we are awake and during sleep.
The hormone begins to be produced in the pineal gland when the day darkens, to help the body prepare to sleep. It reaches its maximum level when we are sleeping.
With sunrise, the pineal gland reduces melatonin production, signalling that it is time to wake up.
An essential characteristic of this system is to be strictly guided by the circadian timing system so that the daily production of melatonin obeys precisely with a circadian rhythmic production synchronized to the environmental lighting cycle characteristic of day and night.  On the other hand, this daily rhythmic production is such that, in any considered species, the peak melatonin production occurs during the night. This production characteristic attributes to melatonin an extremely important role that is to be essential in the process of synchronization of circadian rhythms of the body, in particular sleep and wakefulness and energy metabolism.
Another important feature of the neural functional system that regulates melatonin synthesis is that light present in the environment at night can block, completely, even, (depending on its intensity and wavelength, especially the blue light of 480 nm), the synthesis of pineal melatonin 16,17, and hence it is important to be careful with the light of the electronic devices at bedtime.

 

Bibliography:
1-Houillier P. Mechanisms and regulation of renal magnesium transport. Annu Rev Physiol, 2014; 76:411-30
2-Baaij JHF, Hoenderop JGJ, Bindels RJM. Regulation of magnesium balance: lessons learned from human genetic disease. Clin Kidney J, 2012;
3-Akhondzadeh, Shahin et al. Passionflower in the treatment of generalized anxiety: A pilot double‐blind randomized controlled trial with oxazepam.Journal of clinical pharmacy and therapeutics, v. 26, n. 5, p. 363-367, 2001.
4-Akhondzadeh Khondzadeh, Shahin; Mohammadi, M. R.; Momeni, F. Passiflora incarnata in the treatment of attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder in children and adolescents.Clinical Practice, v. 2, n. 4, p. 609, 2005.
5-Lopes, Mayke Willian; Tiyo, Rogerio; Arantes, Vinicius Pereura. UTILIZAÇÃO DE  PASSIFLORA  INCARNATA  NO  TRATAMENTO  DA  ANSIEDADE. Revista Uningá  Review, v. 29, n. 2, 2017
6-Batista, R. S.; Corrêa, A. D.; Quintas, L. E. M. Plantas medicinais: do cultivo à terapêutica. 2003
7-3. Rolland A., Fleurentin J., Lanhers M. C., Misslin R., Mortier F. Neurophysiological effects of an extract of Eschscholzia californica Cham. (Papaveraceae) Phytotherapy Research. 2001;15(5):377–381. doi: 10.1002/ptr.884.
8-Miyasaka LS, Atallah  AN, Soares B: Valerian for anxiety disorders.  Cochrane  Database of  Systematic  Reviews  2006;(4)  No.:  CD004515. DOI: 10.1002/14651858.CD004515.pub2
9-Bent S, Padula A, Moore D, Pattersson M, Mehling W: Valerian for Sleep: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis. Am J Med 2006;119:1005-1012.
10-Taibi  DM,  Vitiello  MV,  Barsness  S,  Elmer  GW,  Anderson  GD, Landis CA: A Randomized Clinical Trial of Valerian Fails to Improve Self-Report, Polysomnographic, and Actigraphic Sleep in Older Women with Insomnia. Sleep Med. 2009;10(3):319-328
11-Bravo L, Cabo J, Fraile A, Jimenez J, Villar A: Estudio farmacodinámico del lúpulo (Humulus lupulus L.). Acción tranquilizante. Boll. Chim. Farm. 113, 310–315 (1974)
12-Villar A. , ‘Estudio farmacodinámico del lúpulo (Humulus lupulus L.). Acción tranquilizante ‘ (1974 ) 113 Boll. Chim. Farm. : 310 -315.
13-Nakajima  T.,  Kudo  Y.,  Kaneko  Z. Clinical evaluation of  5-hydroxy-L-tryptophan  as an antidepressant drug. Folia Psychiatr Neurol Jpn, 1978; 32:223-230.
14-Wyatt  R.J.,  Zarcone  V.,  Engelman  K.,  et al. Effects of  5-hydroxytryptophan  on the sleep of normal human subjects. Electroencephalogr Clin Neurophysiol, 1971; 30:505-509.
15-Cangiano C., Ceci F., Cascino  A. et al. Eating behaviour and adherence to dietary prescriptions in obese adult subjects treated with 5-hydroxytryptophan. Am J Clin Nutr, 1992; 56:863-867.
16-6.A. Altun, B. Ugur-Altun. Melatonin: therapeutic and clinical utilization. Int J Clin Pract, 61, 5, 835–845, 2007 7. Sophia  L.  Markantonis,  Eleftheria  Tsakalozou, Anteia  Paraskeva, Chryssoula Staikou, Argyro Fassoulaki.
17-Melatonin  Pharmacokinetics in  Premenopausal and Postmenopausal Healthy Female Volunteers. J. Clin. Pharmacol.,48:240-245, 200.